LIONEL PODCAST: Bullets and Pills, Psych Meds and Causation and What the Media Refuse to Report

“Nearly every mass shooting incident in the last twenty years, and multiple other instances of suicide and isolated shootings all share one thing in common, and its not the weapons used.” Dan Roberts in Ammoland reports. (What, doesn’t everyone read Ammoland?)

The overwhelming evidence points to the signal largest common factor in all of these incidents is the fact that all of the perpetrators were either actively taking powerful psychotropic drugs or had been at some point in the immediate past before they committed their crimes.

Multiple credible scientific studies going back more than a decade, as well as internal documents from certain pharmaceutical companies that suppressed the information show that SSRI drugs (Selective Serotonin Re-Uptake Inhibitors) have well known, but unreported side effects, including but not limited to suicide and other violent behavior. One need only Google relevant key words or phrases to see for themselves.

Medication Madness: How Psychiatric Drugs Cause Violence, Suicide, and Crime

Over the years as a psychiatrist I’ve evaluated innumerable cases of individuals who have been driven over the edge by psychiatric drugs. Many of these men, women and children were evaluated for legal cases but others were not. When I was re-evaluating about a hundred of these real-life stories for my latest book, Medication Madness: The Role of Psychiatric Drugs in Cases of Violence, Suicide and Crime, I began to see a pattern that I call medication spellbinding. Technically, the new scientific concept is called intoxication anosognosia: not knowing that you are intoxicated.

But wait, there’s more.

Charleston shooter Dylann Storm Roof was reportedly taking a drug that has been linked with sudden outbursts of violence, fitting the pattern of innumerable other mass shooters who were on or had recently come off pharmaceutical drugs linked to aggression.

According to a CBS News report, earlier this year when cops searched Roof after he was acting suspiciously inside a Bath and Body Works store, they found “orange strips” that Roof told officers was suboxone, a narcotic that is used to treat opiate addiction.

Suboxone is a habit-forming drug that has been connected with sudden outbursts of aggression.

Whither mainstream media? Oh, why even bother?

%d bloggers like this: